Break Out Of Your Comfort Zone and Make the Sale

Break Out Of Your Comfort Zone and Make the Sale

Often, when confronted with situations that are unfamiliar or stressful, we stay in our comfort zone to shield ourselves. But that personal bubble might be holding you back from achieving success.

To reach our goals, in sales and other areas of entrepreneurial life, it is sometimes necessary to take actions that might seem daunting, rather than exhilarating.  So how can you move beyond your comfort zone and achieve your potential?

I believe the combination of passion and purpose is powerful.  Find out how to use them to soar above any personal discomfort and achieve success. More on this, and 14 other strategies and first-hand insights from members of the Forbes Coaches Council in this article on breaking out of your comfort zone.

Learn how to use valuable strategies including:

  • Problem-focused interaction
  • Authenticity
  • Practice and presentation
  • Setting up systems
  • Understanding ‘no’
  • Changing perspectives
  • Experimenting with approaches

Additional reading you may enjoy: Embracing your Inner Salesperson

Find Balance as an Entrepreneur: Learn the True Definition of Success

Find Balance as an Entrepreneur: Learn the True Definition of Success

You can find balance as an entrepreneur if you understand the true definition of success.

I believe in a model of success that hasn’t been applied before, and once you learn it, you can achieve a balance of wealth and well-being.

In the past, there has been no universal definition of success that is holistic and takes the whole person into account. This results in a focus in one area only – such as making money or being of service.

I have worked with a Wall Street executive who dedicated his life to creating wealth, but near the end of his career felt emotionally and spiritually bankrupt. Despite his wealth, he felt like a failure.  On the other end of the spectrum is a woman who had worked directly with the Dalai Lama – a spiritual guru – but she was unable to continue her valuable work because she had no money.  They were extremely successful in one aspect of their lives but could not sustain it. They were either wealthy and unhappy, or well-adjusted but unable to support themselves financially.

If you’d like to learn more about a balanced achievement of wealth and well-being, and understand the definition of success as it applies to the whole person, please listen to this Forbes podcast where I share my ideas, along with other members of the Forbes Coaches Council:

Unlearn What You Have Learned, Focus, & Find Balance

Find out more about:

  • The four cornerstones of success and developing habits to nourish each one
  • The skill of unlearning old habits and proficiencies in order to replace them with new ones
  • Training your brain to overcome moments of overwhelm and distraction

More reading:

Learn more about broken definitions of success.

Negotiation Skills for Leaders

Negotiation Skills for Leaders

Negotiation is a critical leadership skill. We are not all born with it, but you can learn it.

As business leaders we often have to negotiate with clients or employees. We even negotiate in our personal lives.

I was recently asked, along with 14 other members of the Forbes Coaches Council, what skills are important for leaders who want to up their game in negotiations, and how to go about getting those skills.

I share the mistake I see most often, and the quickest path to successful negotiation.

Read more in the Forbes article.

Top 10 Tenets Of Successful Decision Making For Entrepreneurs

Top 10 Tenets Of Successful Decision Making For Entrepreneurs

This article originally published on Forbes.com

Entrepreneurs are faced with an endless array of daily decision making. And, if not handled with conscious control and discernment, it can lead to decision fatigue, causing a decrease in productivity, effectiveness and ability to achieve and sustain success.

As a veteran entrepreneur who has conducted business worldwide, I’ve been directly involved in extensive decision making processes, both on my own behalf and as agent for others. I’ve had the opportunity to witness decision making habits of executives of private and publicly traded companies, Fortune 50 company executives (including their legal counsel and primary partners) and solopreneurs.

Through decades of that direct personal experience, I’ve discovered a pattern of what works to deliver the minimum amount of decision making stress and strain possible and the maximum successful outcome.

1. Eliminate and/or minimize daily, nonessential decision making. When it comes to your daily agenda, use self-control to focus only on what is essential. This keeps your mind fresh and sharp, enabling it to think optimally to achieve the highest outcomes.

2. Avoid polarization. When it comes to business agreements, seek out the core values of the company or person you’re making a decision about. Make sure those values are compatible with yours. When core values are in alignment, communication, problem-solving and shared responsibility flow more easily and effortlessly. When they are not aligned, there is a predisposition toward roadblocks, delays or even failure to achieve success.

3. Avoid people-pleasing. There is a natural human tendency to engage in people-pleasing with the people we like as opposed to those we don’t. Liking someone makes it more challenging to say no or to set a boundary when it’s required and can lead to poor decision making. No matter how much you like another person, don’t lower your standards when it comes to doing your homework. It’s business.

4. Assess personality compatibility. If you don’t like someone yet choose to do business with them anyway, you add extra stress, strain and fatigue to the business relationship and can diminish positive returns. Find someone you have more synergy with.

5. Don’t feel pressured to make decisions on someone else’s “need-by” timeline. Rushing your decision making process to accommodate someone else’s timeline is never a good idea. If the timeline can’t be negotiated to match your needs, it’s a sign that it’s not a good match and will lead to other hard-lining behavior in the future.

6. When in any doubt, don’t make a final decision. Making a final decision in spite of lingering doubts is allowing an unconscious or conscious fear to drive your decision. This is an emotional decision, not a rational one, and it often leads to making poor choices. Wait until you are free from doubt.

7. Don’t rush your contract negotiations for any reason. Rushing negotiations is often a sign of being too hungry for success. It means that you are coming from a place of fear or desperation, which will not net you the positive returns you’re seeking. This will only cause a delay in achieving the success that you want or need.

8. Get references, no matter how renowned or grand the recommendation. It’s imperative, in every circumstance, to do your due diligence to make the wisest, risk-averse decision as possible. You need to hear firsthand the answers to your specific questions. Assuming the answers is a risky proposition.

9. Don’t allow fear to rule your decision making process. Fear is an irrational feeling, and not a rational thought. An irrational mindset leads to mistake-making. Take the time to do all the research, investigation and rational analysis prior to making a decision so fear doesn’t override your rational judgment.

10. Get advice, trust your gut and make your own final decisions. Nobody knows your goals, values, wants, needs or point of view like you do.  Not even the most seasoned expert is likely coming from the same position as you, which can lead you astray. It’s important to get expert advice, but it’s imperative to make your own decisions to achieve the outcomes that you want and need.

Getting mired in too much decision making can lead to decision fatigue, and therefore, failure. Both Barack Obama and Mark Zuckerberg know this all too well. That’s why they eliminate all the nonessential decisions. When Obama was president, he chose to only wear blue or grey suits every day. “I’m trying to pare down decisions,” he said in an interview. “I don’t want to make decisions about what I’m eating or wearing. Because I have too many other decisions to make.”

Similarly, Mark Zuckerberg almost always wears a grey T-shirt and jeans for the same reason. “I really want to clear my life to make it so that I have to make as few decisions as possible about anything except how to best serve this community. And there’s actually a bunch of psychology theory that even making small decisions around what you wear, or what you eat for breakfast, or things like that, they kind of make you tired and consume your energy.”

If not made carefully, every decision, big or small, can deplete your time and energy. By consciously and consistently abiding by the top 10 tenets of successful decision making, you’ll optimally be conditioned to avert decision fatigue and achieve maximum returns and success on your energy spent making decisions.

ON THE COUCH: Shocking Confessions of a Self-Made Millionaire:  The High Price of Not Setting Boundaries

ON THE COUCH: Shocking Confessions of a Self-Made Millionaire: The High Price of Not Setting Boundaries

The word “boundary” has a negative connotation these days. And yet, it is a key concept that defines how to achieve successful relationships of every kind.  Every person has limits. Each person’s limits are different based upon many factors. There is no one-size fits all personal or professional boundary. This is what can make relationships risky.

Entering into any type of relationship, agreement, partnership or contract requires a lot of due diligence and even when due diligence has been performed at the highest levels, there is always inherent risk present. You just don’t know what the other person is capable of doing when faced with challenges that might arise during the engagement. Even in the absence of challenges, the other party may fail to perform.

I’ve been an entrepreneur all my adult life and have conducted business all over the world with small, mid-sized, fortune 500 companies and solopreneurs.  The risk is all the same, but the damages that can occur as a result of not knowing, setting and honoring your own boundaries can vary from minor to catastrophic. The bigger the fish, the greater the potential loss. But, regardless of the size of the fish, the sheer waste of time and energy expended to correct the breach is a drain financially, mentally, emotionally and physically.

The difference between successful people and really successful people is that really successful people say ‘no’ to almost everything. ~Warren Buffett

Here’s How to Know, Set and Honor Your Boundaries to Maximize Your Success and Minimize Your Losses:

1. Know Yourself and Your Values. What behaviors are unacceptable to you? What’s you rule about 2nd chances? Do you allow 1 strike, 2 strikes, or none? What’s your #1 core value that if someone can’t abide, you walk away?

2. Don’t Violate Your Own Values. If you can’t honor your core values than you can expect nobody else will and it is the surest way to fail.

3. Walk Your Talk. If your behavior isn’t consistent with your promises or in general is inconsistent, the weakness will be noted and capitalized upon.

4. Clearly Communicate Your Requirements and Expectations. Take the time and make the effort to clearly set forth your requirements. This is an area where I see many companies and solopreneurs fail which causes them loss and hardship which could have been avoided.

5. Don’t Bluff. Say what you mean and mean what you say. If you set a clear boundary with a promise to seek remedy, then follow through. Making false threats only escalates the problem, is a character trait of a poor leader and set’s you up for potentially even greater losses.

6. Fearlessly Set Your Boundaries. Learn to say no. Don’t let fear make your decisions for you. If you’ve been wronged, harmed or damaged by wrongful behavior of another party, then step out of fear and into action. Nonaction or delaying action can cause you to suffer far greater consequences than standing up for yourself early on.

In Closing My Shocking Confession: A CFO of a major national bank had just committed perjury against me in a take-over attempt to seize everything I owned! WTF!?? Even my well-seasoned attorneys couldn’t believe it. My very expensive team of attorneys immediately told me I’d get crushed and lose everything if I tried to go up against the giant with the truth. They told me to cut my losses and payout the huge amount of money and hand over the assets that they were demanding. I was exhausted after months and months of court proceedings. I was about to throw in the towel, when I thought about how my letting this guy get away with this was going to give him the confidence to keep doing this to others. I had to take the risk and honor my core values which included honesty and having a social conscience.  Exhausted, I dug deep, sorted through mountains of data and correspondence and found the one bit of evidence that confirmed his fraud. Fearlessly, I reported the individual to the appropriate authorities and sent the evidence along with a letter to the founder of the bank (against all attorney advice). He immediately fired the CFO and dropped the claim. I later received a thank you letter from an executive within the bank stating that both the employees and customers had endured years of abuse from this man.