Career Frustration? Four Steps To Getting Unstuck

Career Frustration? Four Steps To Getting Unstuck

This article was originally published on Forbes.com

As a long-term entrepreneur and success coach, I have direct experience dealing with my own and clients’ career frustration. It happens to virtually everyone in every field — regardless of the position you hold.

If not dealt with effectively, the experience of frustration can become overwhelming, unmanageable, scary and even paralyzing. Armed with the proper frustration-busting strategies, you can quickly turn what may feel like a negative no-way-out or doomsday situation into an opportunity for positive change, greater personal and professional expansion and increased success.

When you find yourself stuck in feelings of frustration about your career, here are four steps you can take to get unstuck and move forward in a positive direction:

Step 1: Shift The Energy

The first thing to do is break up the feelings of frustration by refocusing your attention on something different that you have control over. Here are some examples:

A: Move into a different environment that brings you a sense of peace or calm — do something healthy like go outside for a walk or run, or do some other kind of exercise.

B: Go to your favorite coffee shop and sit and sip for a break.

C: Find a quiet place to meditate for 15 minutes.

D: Switch your focus off the source of frustration and onto a work-related task that you enjoy (something that gives you a feeling of joy and accomplishment) and that doesn’t require anyone else’s involvement, such as writing an article.

Most frustration is born out of the inability to get others to do what you want or need them to do. Therefore, by focusing your energy on a task that you have complete control over, you can release the feelings of frustration that bind you. This can take you back into a positive mindset and allow you to revisit the source of frustration and problem-solve in a more rational state of mind.

Step 2: Evaluate The Source Of Frustration

After you’ve returned to a state of calm, it’s time to take a rational and realistic look at the situation and assess whether there is, in fact, a real problem to be solved or whether your own character traits might be causing self-inflicted frustration. Personally, I can allow my tendency to be impatient to cause frustration at times. Write an honest evaluation of your own and/or others’ part in the frustration that you’re feeling. Be honest with yourself, and specifically identify your character traits (unrealistic expectations of others, impatience, fear of the future, etc.).

Step 3: Take Action

If you see that your own traits — such as perfectionism, impatience and unrealistic expectations of others — might be getting in the way of being in a positive state of mind, then commit to working on them to become more effective and successful. Shift the focus off of others and onto yourself by conducting an honest appraisal of yourself. Ask yourself these questions, and write down your answers: What could I be doing better to evolve myself? What could I be doing better in this situation that’s causing me so much frustration? Why am I allowing this to cause me so much stress?

Journaling is one of the best ways to work on your character defects. Another way is to work with a coach or mentor to help you identify what’s at the root of the fear that’s driving the frustration. This can release the fear that binds you, help you liberate yourself from those traits and maximize success in minimum time.

If you find that it’s someone else who is leading to your frustration — because they’re failing to do what they’re responsible for or they aren’t capable of performing their job — then the next step might be to either talk to them about their performance or to begin the search to replace them.

Step 4: Don’t Settle For Less

Sometimes we stay the course in jobs, relationships and situations long after we’ve seen the hard evidence that they aren’t a healthy fit for our career goals or our overall well-being. It’s often uncomfortable to confront the reality that it may be time to move on, but staying in an unhealthy situation for too long will likely continue to cause you frustration and postpone the achievement of your goals. In the end, it probably doesn’t serve you or others involved.

If you find that something in your current career is a consistent source of frustration after having taken all of the above steps, don’t see it as a sign of failure, but rather as a sign of your own positive growth. Congratulate yourself because it means that you’ve put in the hard work and are now ready for an upgrade to something more fulfilling that can serve to help you attain true success, which I believe is a balanced achievement of both wealth and well-being.

14 Things You Should Never Say In A Job Interview

14 Things You Should Never Say In A Job Interview

Whether you’re new to the job market or a pro looking for a new opportunity, a job interview can be intimidating.

We all want to make a good impression and meet the potential employer’s expectations during that interview. And the last thing we want is to say or do something that ruins our chances of getting the job.

I, along with other members of the Forbes Coaches Council Expert Panel, were asked for our top tips to help you avoid slip-ups in your next job interview. Don’t invite the interviewer to look for reasons NOT to hire you by making any of these mistakes.

From how to talk about your skills and experience, your past work, your weaknesses and more, here are 14 things you should never say in a job interview.

Read the full article on Forbes.com

And if you do get the job, here are 13 questions to ask before accepting.

13 Sure Signs Your Job Isn’t The Right Fit

13 Sure Signs Your Job Isn’t The Right Fit

How do you know if you’re in the wrong job, or if a new job offer will be a good fit?

Your career goals can change over time, and the wrong job will only delay your success.

There are many signs your job is not a good fit, starting with the company’s values.  Know what a company stands for before you accept employment, and make sure it’s a match for your own beliefs. If your existing employer is no longer living up to the values they had when you started, it may be time to move on. Choosing to stay will only delay your success.

Just surviving in a job isn’t enough. You should be thriving.  Are you constantly bored or having negative feelings about the work you do? Has there been a change in management or company direction? Are you utilizing your strengths?

I shared my thoughts on this topic, along with other members of the Forbes Coaches Council.  Find out our 13 clear signs your job isn’t the right fit in this article on Forbes.

You might also be interested in the top questions to ask before taking a job.

13 Questions to Ask Before Taking A Job

13 Questions to Ask Before Taking A Job

Being offered a new job may sound wonderful. But there’s always more to think about than the salary and benefits offered.

Are you sure the job – and the company – is the best fit for you? What do you need to know before making your decision?

That question was recently put to members of the Forbes Coaches Council, and we offered our first-hand insights.

Whether it’s during the interview or after an offer has been made, ask these 13 essential questions and make sure the answers match your goals and values to ensure your success.

Read the full article at Forbes.com.