Every single person on this planet, at some time or another, has created a goal and failed at achieving it. It’s a fact of life. You can’t hit a home run every time, but you can certainly succeed at winning the game provided you keep getting back up at bat and learn from the experience. I know, it is easier said than done. It hurts to fall down. It’s not always easy to pick yourself up and get back in the game.

Having the ability to pick yourself up, one more time, takes personal strength—sometimes herculean strength at that. Sometimes, in the pursuit of success or in others pursuit of success, we get hit so hard we don’t think we will ever get the strength to pull ourselves up again to get back in the game. And, sometimes, we have no choice but to raise ourselves up, regardless of extreme exhaustion, battle wounds and fear, in order to continue to fight for our lives.

The degree of success that one can achieve in one’s lifetime is directly related to how many times one is able to get up and carry on after a fall.

“It’s hard to beat a person that never gives up.” – Babe Ruth

Get the endurance you need to persevere and succeed in the face of any, and all failures, challenges and stumbles on your path to extreme success:

The Six Endurance Steps to Extreme Success

1. Practice Delayed Gratification: I can’t say enough about the power of practicing self-restraint. It builds extreme mental, physical, spiritual and financial strength. Start practicing by using impulse control. Wait to say or buy something that doesn’t have to be said or bought right away. Wait a bit after 1st hunger pang, and delay doing something that you want to do that really isn’t important to your responsibilities or progress.

2. Build a Strong Mind and Body: Practicing step 1 above will help you gain mental strength. Add to that regular physical exercise and sound nutrition that supports a strong mind and body. Incorporate “Live” foods in your diet to live stronger and longer. Live foods are raw foods.

3. Let Go of False Pride: Train yourself not to be concerned what people think of you and your successes or failures. False pride is ego that leads to poor decision making and may make permanent defeat out of a temporary fall. Humility is a window to “seeing” what next to do and how to do it better.

4. Focus on the Growth Opportunity in Every Situation: There is no situation that is devoid of benefit and opportunity to succeed on a higher level than imagined prior to a fall. Practice looking for every seed of benefit in every situation, encounter and event taking place in your life.

5. Don’t Get Mad, Get Even: Sometimes, bad people do bad things and you feel justifiable anger. Don’t let the anger push you to say, behave and do things out of your character. Stay true to you and understand the best revenge is succeeding again all odds.

6. Practice Faith: We’re only human and sometimes circumstances can be so overwhelming that we get knocked down and stay down longer than we’d like or we can’t solve the problem ourselves and have no one to turn to. This is where having a daily practice of faith will serve and save you. It will provide you the solution, strength, comfort and courage needed to carry you through to success.

In the end, success is not how many times you fall or fail, but how many times you get back up. I can tell you with utmost certainty that there is no failure, no challenge or no fall from grace, that can take you down and keep you down. Only, we ourselves, have the power to allow that to happen.

In Closing My Not So Shocking Confession: I’ve been practicing all of the six steps above on a daily basis for quite some time now. They’ve literally saved my life (yes, medically speaking), financially, and allowed me to self-create and sustain a life of wealth and well-being against all extreme odds. But, there was a time when I didn’t know that a successful life was a series of picking yourself up and never allowing yourself to stay down.

This past Sunday, I went out to run my regular route. It was a gorgeous day. There were more people out at that early hour enjoying the day than normal. There were many families out with their kids in strollers and everyone was smiling and happy. Suddenly, right in front of me, a small boy, no more than six years old, falls down hard off his bike onto the hard asphalt. He looks embarrassed, terrified and about to cry.  As I run past him, I begin to clap my hands in approval and say “Good job! Get up and keep going!”. The threat of tears vanquished, he pushed himself up off the ground, got on his bike and pushed forward. His parents gave me a grateful smile as I ran past to finish my jog.

How wonderful it would be if we all learned to applaud the power and purpose of enduring the fall…especially at an early stage.