Everyone wants to achieve unending success. Entrepreneurs and solopreneurs work endlessly to keep their pipelines filled with new clients, customers, new marketing strategies and new opportunities. And, while all this activity is good for building your success, it can cause you to burn up and out, unless you do this one very important thing….

Make taking care of your existing customers top priority. If you don’t, your competitors certainly will, and you will lose your biggest asset (your loyal customer base) and your opportunity for unending success.

I’m an extremely loyal person in all my affairs, including business. I seek to make and keep long-lasting relationships. If I’m your client, you’ll have me forever unless you royally f-up. And, unfortunately, I encounter this far too frequently. It’s truly an inconvenient truth. Worse than delivering this truth is the inconvenience of the time, energy, and money that it costs us loyal customers when our trusted contractors drop the ball. But, out of the wreckage of a company who can’t or won’t make servicing and valuing their customers a top priority, is the foregone conclusion that the customer will always find someone to replace the company that drops the ball.

Unending success is a simple math equation. A company that can’t keep a customer happy, will burn up and out no matter how many customers they add. And, the company who can, achieves sustainable success.

achieve unending success

The Top 5 Non-Negotiables to Ensure Your Never-Ending Success:

  1. See Your Clients as Cash in Your Bank Account:
    Realize that every time you drop the ball on going the extra mile to service their needs or to make sure they’re satisfied and happy will automatically withdraw cash from your account until it’s eventually wiped out. But, if you go the extra mile, the balance keeps getting higher.
  2. Consistently and Continuously Ask Yourself “How Can I Serve My Clients Better:
    This includes how you can make it easier for customers to continue to do business with you. If your competitors are making it easier than you are, you’re going to lose market share.
  3. Always Maintain Good Relations:
    Even when and if you lose a client, it’s important not to end on a bad note. Keep the door open.
  4. Don’t Make Doing Business Difficult:
    Do what you say you’re going to do and deliver it in the time frame you promise. And, make communications easy and effortless.
  5. Go the Extra Mile:
    Show your clients that you value them by never taking them for granted. A simple personalized token of appreciation always returns 10x above what it may cost in time or money. Send a simple handwritten note or gift or make a check-in phone call. Routinely ask your customers if there is anything that you can do to make things easier or better for them.

The true art of doing business is found in the art of taking care of your customers.

Commit yourself to being a brilliant artist who can show a wide array of brilliant colors that wow your patrons. If you do, you’ll be amazed how much more success you will attain and sustain.

In Conclusion My Shocking Confession: I admit, I got real bitchy y’all! I wanted to do a big-time upgrade to one of my operating systems in one of my buildings. I had been using the same company for over a decade. So, naturally, I called them and gave them the “come get me” speech. Told them I wanted it asap. Well, after a decade of being a paying customer with virtually not a single complaint or issue on my account, began the series of dropping the ball. The events went like this: It took them forever to send account rep; he came and stayed forever to “run out the clock” at work; he lost his notes; gave me a price that later the manager confirmed, then the manager changed his mind and added 25% more; account rep while visiting cut off existing service and didn’t realize it; company’s system didn’t detect it; continued to charge me for service which non-operation left my building exposed to harm. And, lastly, when I had no recourse but to reach out to their competitor to get new service, former co. made it ridiculously difficult and burdensome to close my account and insisted that I pay for the period of non-service! Bridge burned… never going back. I love my new company 😊